Fake Facebook Privacy Notice

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In response to the new Facebook guidelines I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, graphics, comics, paintings, photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times!  (Anyone reading this can copy this text and paste it on their Facebook Wall. This will place them under protection of copyright laws. By the present communiqué, I notify Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, disseminate, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and/or its contents. The aforementioned prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents and/or any staff under Facebook’s direction or control. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of my privacy is punished by law (UCC 1 1-308-308 1-103 and the Rome Statute).  Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are recommended to publish a notice like this, or if you prefer, you may copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once, you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates…

You may have noticed a trend on Facebook in the past few days where your Friends are posting a status update claiming they hold the rights to all of their content on Facebook. This is in response to privacy changes by Facebook. Sorry, this “declaration of rights” does you no good. If you accepted the terms and conditions of Facebook (if you have an account or continue to hold an account, then you are accepting their terms) this status update will do nothing to change that.

Exactly what are you agreeing to? From Facebook’s Terms:

For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

Simply putting a statement up saying you own the rights doesn’t do you any good nor does it actually protect your content or privacy. It is up to you to be smart about what you post and use your privacy and application settings to protect your privacy. Avoid a flood of comments pointing out this is fake and do not post this update.

Also, the “Berner Convention” really does not help you here since what they intended to mention was the “Berne Convention“. (Still does not apply)

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